2020-2021 Annual Report

Reflection on 20 years

As I thought about how to reflect on the 2020-2021 academic year, it occurred to me that I have concluded 20 years as the Director of the Women in Engineering Program. In the abstract, 20 years sounds like a long time, but as the saying goes, "time flies when you are having fun!"

Twenty years ago, I had the honor and privilege to start as the 5th Director of Women in Engineering, immediately following the longstanding tenure of Dr. Jane Zimmer Daniels (1980 - 2001, now Director Emerita). Over the course of these 20 years, I have observed that some things have remained steadfastly constant, and some things have changed.

First, the constants:

  • The vibrancy of the Women in Engineering Program and its significant impact on students.

  • The enthusiastic support of our alums, friends, and corporate partners.

  • The engagement and dedication of our student leaders.

  • The institutional support for the Women in Engineering Program and its mission.

But, oh the changes that have happened over the course of 20 years!

  • As of the fall of 2021, there were 4014 women students in the College of Engineering (25.5%) compared to 1472 women in fall of 2001 (17.5%). That's a 173% increase in the enrollment of women, compared to an 88% increase in the overall enrollment in the College of Engineering over that time.

  • Our programs have expanded! A few examples - the undergraduate peer mentoring program (M&M) now serves over 600 students annually, compared to 98 students in 2001. And the outreach programming to students in K-10th grades now reaches over 4000 students annually, compared to less than 50 in 2001.

  • The directorship of the Women in Engineering Program was named in honor of Dean Emerita Leah Jamieson, and an endowment of over $2M benefitting the program was established in her honor.

  • The Women in Engineering Program celebrated its 50-year anniversary in 2019.

I've also had some changes in my professional and personal life over that time. In 2008, I started in the PhD program in the School of Engineering Education, and graduated in 2013. In 2014, I was named an Assistant Dean of Engineering in addition to Director of Women in Engineering. This expanded role has allowed me to have an even broader impact on students in the College of Engineering. I've been honored to serve on the Boards of Directors of two national engineering associations (the Women in Engineering ProActive Network (WEPAN), and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)), and was elected fellow of ASEE in 2017. But perhaps the most obvious marking of the passage of time centers on my children. When I started at Purdue in 2001, my twins were just 1.5 years old. Now, they are both seniors in engineering at Purdue, scheduled to graduate in May 2022. It has been a joy and a pleasure to watch them choose to study engineering, choose to study at Purdue, choose their engineering majors, choose their involvements and extracurriculars, watch how Purdue has shaped them over their time here, and to wait in optimistic anticipation of their graduation and life beyond.

The Women in Engineering Program has had a positive impact on countless numbers of women students in the College of Engineering. And it's had a profound impact on me also. I look forward to continuing to work in partnership with you to continue our mission to enrich the profession of engineering through the full participation of women.

Beth Holloway, Ph.D., F.ASEE
Assistant Dean for Diversity and Engagement
Leah H. Jamieson Director of Women in Engineering
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering (by courtesy)
College of Engineering, Purdue University


WOMEN in Engineering Programming




ENROLLMENT OF WOMEN IN ENGINEERING


Student Reflections

The impact of the Women in Engineering Program is unequivocally reflected in our students - current and future. The contributions and engagement of our student leaders are a critical part of the program, along with those of our alums and supporters. We hope you can see the impact of the influence that the Women in Engineering Program has through a showcase of our energetic and dedicated student leaders.


Internships

Honda (Summer 2021)

GE Appliances (Spring 2021)

General Motors (Summer 2020)

What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? What is your favorite part of being part of WIEP?

I was inspired to join the leadership team since I have a passion for advocating and supporting other women and minorities, and I still wanted to be part of the program, even though I was pursuing a co-op opportunity. I was also both a mentee and a mentor for a couple of years, so I felt that I had a good grasp on the program from the participant perspective. In terms of outreach, I find it valuable to show kids what engineers do, and that there are so many kinds of engineering. I never knew what I wanted to do as a kid, and I didn't know Industrial Engineering (IE) existed until I wanted to change my major during my sophomore year. Showing kids what opportunities exist for them and being able to share my passion for IE is very rewarding and my favorite part of WIEP.

Describe yourself in three words.

Tenacious. Empathetic. Candid.

What do you get from WIEP that you don't get from other programs on campus?

Lifting and encouraging other women and women of color to stand up for themselves and let their voices, opinions, and thoughts be heard. I feel like I have learned so much from my time at Purdue, and I love being able to share what I've learned in efforts to help other women engineers thrive. If there's anything that I'd like to be remembered for, it's in lifting up others to help them succeed.


Current Research

Focuses on using novel ceramics processing techniques to fabricate high-temperature silicon carbide heat exchanges.

What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? What is your favorite part of being part of WIEP?

I got involved in WIEP my very first year in graduate school as I was looking for ways to make friends. I started by going to the lunch and learn events that were hosted by GWEN. Not only has GWEN provided me a social outlet where I could find friends and colleagues outside of my department and lab group, but I was also learning skills that would be useful in my future career plans.

My inspiration for joining the GWEN leadership team was the future female graduate students that would come through Purdue's College of Engineering. I found a community of women who were talented and passionate about their fields of research, and I want everyone to have the chance to experience that same sense of belonging I felt. I knew that I had skills and ideas that would continue to cultivate the supportive environment of GWEN so, I joined the leadership team.

The best part about being part of WIEP is getting to interact with graduate students outside of your discipline. Grad school can be isolating at times, being able to interact with others who are not in your discipline helped me to feel less alone.

Describe yourself in three words.

Supportive. Honest. Determined.

What is one piece of advice that you would like to share with female engineers that you might not have known when you started?

Asking for help is not a sign of weakness but a sign of strength and maturity.


Internship

Ecolab

What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? What is your favorite part of being part of WIEP?

As an out of state student, I wanted to broaden my horizons as much as I could and involve myself in things that would help me grow and inspire creativity. Being an M&M participant my freshman year, I recognized how valuable the Mentees and Mentors program was for encouraging participants to develop themselves professionally and I wanted to become more involved in the planning and networking that went into these opportunities for women in engineering.

My favorite part about being in WIEP is how the program has allowed me to discover myself and develop strengths and passions for art through the encouragement of the leadership team and our directors to develop creative activities and goodies for our program. It's through this outlet that I realized that art and engineering are not drastically different studies but a combination of each other as they both require creativity. By being on the leadership team, I also recognized that I love to bounce ideas around with teammates to create solid plans. Everyone around us has different viewpoints and experiences that can help you visualize the world in a different way and learning why and how people think is incredibly valuable as an engineer.

Describe yourself in three words.

Creative. Adaptable. Curious.

What is one piece of advice that you would like to share with female engineers that you might not have known when you started?

One piece of advice that I wish I knew when I started was that it's okay not to absolutely love math and science. One of the biggest things I hear when I tell someone that I'm an engineering student is "oh, you must be really great at math!" While math was something I didn't have to put much effort into understanding before college, college math was a whole other beast to me. I found myself struggling to learn math in the way professors taught it and I began despising math. For most of freshman and sophomore year, I found myself questioning if I was meant to be an engineer because I no longer enjoyed math and really struggled. Part of my learning curve was learning that it is okay to reach out for help, since everyone learns in different ways. The most important thing that I learned was that everyone has different ways of defining what engineering is and those don't define "requirements" for being an engineer. Sure, you still must learn and pass math classes to get an engineering degree, but you don't have to love math to be an engineer. Personally, I think of engineering as artistic problem solving. I enjoy thinking of out of the box approaches and ideas to solve a problem. From there, I can apply basics of math and use computers around me if math is required in an approach.


Internships and Co-ops

Interned at Hanley, Flight & Zimmerman LLC (Summer 2021)

Co-oped with Zimmer Biomet (Spring and Fall 2019)

What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? What is your favorite part of being part of WIEP?

I specifically remember attending Juniors Exploring Engineering at Purdue (JEEP, now Exploring Engineering at Purdue) during the spring of my junior year of high school. It was my first college visit, and I was instantly drawn to Purdue. The Women in Engineering Program had a large influence in that because I knew I would be supported throughout my undergrad from the program and there were a lot of opportunities to get involved and make a large campus feel small.

Since starting at Purdue, I have been able to be involved with WIEP beyond just my team, volunteering for events like Exploring Engineering and Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day. I love these events because I enjoy working with younger girls and showing them all they can do with engineering.

I specifically was interested in the WE Link leadership team because I got involved with the program early, during my freshman year, and attended the volunteer nights and joined the Recruitment Project Committee. Through my work on the WE Link leadership team, I have made countless connections with prospective students which is easily my favorite part of the job. Our initiatives remain the same, but how we fulfill them changes constantly, especially as campus and daily activities have changed due to the pandemic and as social media becomes more important.

Describe yourself in three words.

Disciplined. Achiever. Learner.

How do you foresee being involved in WIEP after graduation?

After graduation, I am pursuing a less common career path - patent law. One day I would like to advocate for this field, especially in female engineers. Through the Women in Engineering Program, I can utilize the alum network and the resources that WIEP provides to undergrads to teach students more about intellectual property and the careers associated with it.


What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? What is your favorite part of being part of WIEP?

I was inspired to join a leadership team by the camaraderie I saw between leadership team members as a volunteer. The Women in Engineering Program employs incredibly intelligent, ambitious, and kind women and I knew I wanted to be a part of that community. I have made great friends through my role on the leadership team, and I am so glad I decided to get more involved with the program.

My favorite part of being involved with WIEP, other than getting to work with my teammates, is getting to interact with prospective students. During COVID-19, the WE Link team started doing video chats with admitted students to answer any questions they had. I really enjoyed getting to talk about life as a Purdue Engineering student and about resources and ways to get involved on campus. Since then, I have seen some of the students I video chatted with as high schoolers who are now current students at Purdue on campus. It is super rewarding to know that I contributed to someone's decision to attend Purdue.

Describe yourself in three words.

Strong. Intelligent. Witty.

What have you gained from the Women in Engineering Program (not just your LT role) that have helped you be successful?

Living in the Women in Engineering Program Learning Community freshman year helped me make friendships and connections that have lasted during my four years at Purdue. Some of the girls who lived on my floors are still in my major, which was great for having familiar faces during my transition into Biomedical Engineering. Additionally, getting to talk with alumna at Access Alum has been great. The incredibly accomplished women at Access Alum events are not only great resources for career advice and networking, but also for insight into being a woman in an engineering role.


What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? In your role, what do you enjoy the most?

I didn't know that Chemical Engineering was a thing until the Women in Engineering Program reached out to me for IGED (Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day), and I want to spread that knowledge to others. My favorite part is being able to connect and work with other engineers from all concentrations.

Describe yourself in three words.

Empathetic. Smart. Kind.

What have you gained from the Women in Engineering Program (not just your LT role) that have helped you be successful?

I have gained valuable leadership experience, new friends and connections, and have spread the love of STEM to many others.


What have you gained from the Women in Engineering Program (not just your LT role) that have helped you be successful?

I learned that my perspective and input are valuable, even in group environments where I am less experienced. Through talking one-on-one with participants and having meetings with the leadership team, I have gained confidence in using my voice.

Describe yourself in three words.

Curious. Thoughtful. Creative.

What is one piece of advice that you would like to share with female engineers that you might not have known when you started?

I did not previously know that there exists a whole community that will prepare you for your future career of being a woman in STEM. My advice for any young female engineer is to take advantage of the resources available in this program, network with your peers, and take control of your own growth.


Internships

US Army Corps of Engineers in navigation design

LJA Engineering in land development

What have you gained from the Women in Engineering Program (not just your LT role) that have helped you be successful?

The connections I have formed through the Women in Engineering Program have greatly influenced my success in classes and in finding internships. The staff, alumni, and fellow students are supportive mentors who have taught me many valuable lessons. These experiences have shaped my problem-solving, communication, and leadership skills which have been beneficial in many team projects and internship interviews.

Describe yourself in three words.

Determined. Ambitious. Persistent.

How do you foresee being involved in WIEP after graduation?

I hope to stay involved with the Women in Engineering Program even as an alum. I have been thankful to receive scholarships from WIEP and hope that I can give back by donating to the program so that other students are able to benefit as I did.


Research Focus

Geotechnical Engineering

What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? What is your favorite part of being part of WIEP?

As an international student, when I arrived at Purdue, I felt lost and alone. Being part of the WIEP leadership team made me feel included and gave me a community that I could rely on. My favorite part of being part of WIEP is to offer the same support that I once received. Showing to other girls that you can dream bigger and thrive instead of just surviving graduate school.

Describe yourself in three words.

Resilient. Hard-working. Friendly.

My non-linear path to graduate school


What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? What is your favorite part of being part of WIEP?

I was inspired to join the leadership team because I wanted to be able to encourage children, especially young girls, to go into engineering or to experience what engineering can be like. I also wanted to be able to be seen as a mentor figure for the children so that they understand that engineers are all very different and that there is so much you are able to do with engineering. My favorite part of being a part of WIEP is being able to make new friends with the other students that I work with and learning about the other majors through them.

Describe yourself in three words.

Determined. Genuine. Adventurous.

What is one piece of advice that you would like to share with female engineers that you might not have had when you started?

My advice to other female engineers would be to build a community around you who support you and make sure that there is a mixture of engineers, both female and male, along with non-engineers so that you have people you can talk to about things that are not engineering related.


Internships

AstraZeneca-Automation Engineering (Summer 2021)

Allen and Shariff-Mechanical Engineering (Summer 2020)

What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? In your role, what do you enjoy the most?

I wanted to spread my love for engineering to children. Especially for kids who don't know what engineering is or think they could never be an engineer. As a woman in engineering, I want to be an example to young girls that engineering is a career option for them. My favorite part of being in WIEP is the difference we make. Every time a kid says they want to be an engineer is us making a difference.

Describe yourself in three words.

Curious. Enthusiastic. Outgoing.

What is one piece of advice that you would like to share with female engineers that you might not have known when you started?

Don't be afraid to speak up. As an engineer you will be a part of a lot of teams. Not all of them will be a great experience. Especially as a woman in engineering you might not always be asked for your input or ideas. But always say what you are thinking, even if it means disagreeing with team members.


Internships and Co-ops

3 Term Co-op with Marathon Petroleum

Internship with FedEx Ground

What inspired you to join a leadership team with the Women in Engineering Program? What is your favorite part of being part of WIEP?

I joined the M&M leadership team because I wanted program participants to have the same positive experiences as I did. The M&M program helped introduce me to my best friends at Purdue. I spent my first year attending program events with the same women. We grew together both as friends and as classmates, and they affirmed my interest in engineering. My favorite part of being part of WIEP is meeting so many powerful women. The staff, student employees, and participants have all had a positive impact on my life and made me confident in my career choice.

Describe yourself in three words.

Loyal. Dependable. Funny.

What have you gained from the Women in Engineering Program (not just your LT role) that have helped you be successful?

The Women in Engineering Program has taught me numerous skills that I would not have learned in the classroom. Through my experiences I have learned how to network effectively, the importance of mentorship, and how to manage my time. By talking to peers and alumni, I have learned from their experiences and felt prepared to take on my classes and career.


Individual Donations FY - 2020-21

$20,000 and above

John Edwardson and Francesca Edwardson
John La Duc and Polly La Duc
James Voss and Louise Voss

$5,000 and above

John Gleiter and Roberta Gleiter
Gale Rahmoeller
William Wolpert and Judith Wolpert
Boon Yeo and Minerva Ming Yee Yeung

$1,000 and above

Sue Abreu
Marcia Alstott and Ted Alstott
Tabby Armstrong
Christine Barman and Brian Dunn
Jeremy Bolinger and Allison Bahnsen-Bolinger
David Bradley and Cynthia Bradley
Christine Browning
Michael Cvelbar
Oron Daihes and Kristen Daihes
Jane Daniels
Patricia Davies
Juan Ernesto de Bedout
Ed Delery
Renee Fieldhouse
Roger Fowee and Diana Fowee
Lori Fraleigh and Charles Fraleigh
Thomas Gallant and Erica Gallant
Scott Goings and Janet Goings
Lisa Harding and Walter Harding
Beth Holloway and Eric Holloway
Yimin Huang
Thomas Insley and Susan Insley
Kimberly Johnson
Elizabeth Klimes and David Klimes
Anand Koka
Rosemary Lafrance and Pierre Lafrance
Alfred Lucas and Janet Lucas
Donna Mackinley
Donna Marvel and Paul Marvel
Christine Maziar
Shirley McCarty and John McCarty
Anne McLaren
Robert Nalewajk and Susan Nalewajk
Tyler Parsons and Kari Parsons
W. Bradshaw Pillow
Patricia Poppe and Eric Poppe
James Porter and Deborah Grubbe
Sandra Postel
Mary Quinn
Marisela Reyes
Kathryn Rivera and Jose Rivera
Ronna Robertson
Daryl Robertson
Nancy Sarkisian
Sarah Smith
John Stauffer
Leslie Sullivan
Jeffrey Tang
Sonia Teran
Edwin Thiedeman
Doug Upshaw and Susanne Upshaw
Daniel Whitty and Stacey Kacek
James Wilson and Anne Wilson
Sally Wittbrod
Bob Ziek and Marcy Ziek

$500 and above

Roger Au and Lorel Au
Michelle Burke
Theresa Carter
Max Centrella
Wen-Chi Chen
Robert Clark
Gary Cummings and Lynn Cummings
Cheryl Cunningham and Chester Parsons
Peter Davee and Tracie Davee
Kristine Dermody-Nolan and Brian Nolan
Jeff Dickmann and Karen Dickmann
Timothy Doolin and Alison Doolin
Julie Eddleman and Diane Cummins
Paul Fanson and Jennifer Fanson
Gregory Fiechtner and Linda Blevins
Elias Franses and Nien-hwa Wang
Patricia Galloway
Hiam Garner and Nancy Deaton
Kelli Grothen and Chad Grothen
Jane Howell
Inez Hua
Joan Isman and Kenneth Isman
Carrie Kendrick and Brian Kendrick
William Leese and Kristin Leese
Bob Lenard and Chantel Lenard
Heather Light
Rachel Mace
Dale Mallett and Anne Mallett
Patrick Mannion and Gwyn Mannion
William McClung and Melinda McClung
Ronald McHenry
Pamela McVeigh
James Mehling and Susan Ellspermann
Jeri Metzger
Anne Marie Mills
Kristin Peter
Heidi Peterson
Elizabeth Potrzebowski and Adam Potrzebowski
Rick Randjelovic
Jon Reinke-Walter and Pamela Reinke-Walter
Robert Roth and Christine Blanck
Mark Rubino and Melanie Rubino
Ann Stauch and John Stauch
Peter Stout and Beth Bottos
Karen Suitor
Aaron Totemeier
Kathryn Wagner
Cameron WieseYoung and Chloe WieseYoung
Alice Wilson

Corporate and Foundation Giving FY - 2020-21

$25,000 and above

General Motors Company

$10,000 and above

Motorola Solutions Inc.
Deere & Company
Duke Energy Corporation
Carrier Corporation
Collins Aerospace Systems
Raytheon Technologies

$5,000 and above

Bechtel Corporation
Boeing Company
Caterpillar Incorporated
Duke Energy Foundation
Exxon Mobil Corporation

Up to $5,000 and matching gifts

3M
Abbott Laboratories
Air Products
American Electric Power
Boston Scientific Corporation
CenterPoint Energy
Chevron
Clorox Company
Eli Lilly & Co. Foundation
ExxonMobil Foundation
General Mills Inc.
Google Inc.
Honeywell International
IBM International Foundation
Intel Corporation
JP Morgan Chase Foundation
Kimberly-Clark Corporation
L3Harris Technologies
Medtronic
Microsoft
Netflix
Norfolk Southern Foundation
Northrop Grumman Corporation
Oracle Corporation
Raytheon
Samsung Electronics NA
Stanley Black & Decker, Inc.
The Amgen Foundation
Toyota
Trane Technologies
Tyson Foods
Union Pacific
Unionville Ranch
Viasat, Inc.

Neil Armstrong Hall of Engineering, Room 1245
701 West Stadium Avenue
West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2045
(765) 494-3889
[email protected]
www.purdue.edu/wiep